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Tuesday, March 25, 2014
March 25, 2014 | 10:57 AM

Selected Recent Sales of Grapes & Wines in Bulk for March 24, 2014 courtesy of Turrentine Brokerage:

Bulk Wine

Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 wine, Monterey County, 52,000 gallons at $10.00 per gallon

Pinot Noir 2013 wine, Napa Carneros, 6,600 gallons at $20.00 per gallon

Sauvignon Blanc 2013 wine, Russian River, 5,700 gallons at $12.50 per gallon

Chardonnay 2013 wine, Napa Carneros, 8,000 gallons at $16.00 per gallon


Grapes

Pinot Noir 2014 grapes, Sonoma Coast, 30 tons at $4,000.00 per ton

Cabernet Sauvignon 2014 grapes, Napa Valley (Wooden Valley), 30 tons at $4,750.00 per ton

Cabernet Sauvignon 2014 grapes, Mendocino County, 50 tons at $2,200.00 per ton

 

Monday, March 24, 2014
March 24, 2014 | 4:25 PM

Across the newsdesk this week is a press release from Food Tank about World Water Day, which is this Saturday, March 22. On World Water Day this year, Food Tank honors the projects, people, and programs working tirelessly to achieve more with less water and creating innovative systems for the future. Read more about the objectives of World Water Day here. Below is a release from Food Tank.

This Saturday, March 22nd, the world celebrates World Water Day. Water and agriculture are inextricably interlinked and interdependent. Agriculture is a major user of both ground and surface water for irrigation—accounting for about 70 percent of water withdrawal worldwide.

Europe uses, on average, 44 percent of water for agricultural use. In the United States, agriculture accounts for around 80 percent of consumptive water use. And in Western U.S. States, such as California, over 90 percent of water use is for agricultural purposes.

California is also facing the worst drought since records began, 100 years ago—approximately 95 percent of the state remains in a drought, with about 23 percent experiencing “exceptional” drought. The state also happens to be America’s breadbasket, supplying nearly half the country's fruits, nuts, and vegetables, and is a major producer of almonds, artichokes, grapes, olives, and other products.

But all over the world farmers are using innovative practices to utilize water more efficiently and in lesser quantities to produce more nutritious foods. And eaters can profoundly reduce water waste and consumption through the food choices they make each day.

In Syria, in the four regions hit hardest by groundwater shortages, the FAO helped the Ministry of Agriculture improve irrigation technology and management techniques. The project benefited 2,750 farmers by providing drip irrigation systems and training farmers on their installation. Drip irrigation saves both water and fertilizer inputs by allowing water to drip slowly through a network of tubing to the roots of plants. And it’s something that can be used on both small large farms all over the world.

Drip irrigation was also introduced on Cape Verde, helping boost the island’s horticultural production from 5,700 tonnes to 17,000 tonnes over an eight year period. And now more than 20 percent of the country’s irrigation has been converted to drip irrigation. Rethinking crop production has helped conserve water resources as well—farmers on the island converted their sugar cane plantations, which are water-intensive, to more diverse crop production, including cultivating peppers and tomatoes, that require less resources and are more suitable to the region’s climate.

In Israel and Spain, farmers have started re-using drainage water from urban areas mixed with groundwater for supplying water to crops. And in California agricultural waste water from irrigating crops is being reclaimed and treated for re-use, benefiting the environment by avoiding discharge of chemicals into surface water and helping retain soil nutrients by preventing them from being washed away with the run-off water.

Across India, the Watershed Organization Trust (WOTR) regenerates watershed communities by harvesting rain water, organizing communities to sustainably manage the land, optimizing irrigation, and planting crops based on water availability. WOTR has reached more than 300,000 people in 300 villages, rejuvenating 200,000 hectares of land.

 

March 24, 2014 | 12:12 PM

Mary Maher of Harlan Estate has been selected as the 2014 recipient of the prestigious Napa Valley Grower of the Year award by the Napa Valley Grapegrowers. Maher will be honored for her broad contributions to Napa Valley agriculture and the community on May 16 at the 39th NVG Annual Dinner Celebration at Artesa Winery in Napa.

2014 marks Maher’s 30th year in Napa Valley vineyards, and her contributions have helped shape the quality and the style for which Napa is known. Click here to read more about Mary. Nominations for the Napa Valley Grower of the Year come from the NVG membership and the recipient is chosen by a Selection Committee made up of Past Presidents of the organization and current committee members.


Photo courtesy of Olaf Beckmann
 

Tuesday, March 18, 2014
March 18, 2014 | 6:57 AM

Video: The founders of the Garagiste Festival in scenic Paso Robles welcome us to their bazaar of independent wineries and let us know how the event has grown from its inaugural run the year before, as well as clue us in to the directions they are taking it.

The next Garagiste Festival is taking place March 29th and 30th, and returns to the beautiful, Mission-style Veterans Memorial Hall in the heart of Solvang, California. Get tickets here.

Monday, March 17, 2014
March 17, 2014 | 2:03 PM

Via the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources:

The latest research-based advice on weathering a drought is now available free online

Spring is here, and California farming is in full swing. But this year, the agriculture industry is operating under the burden of unrelenting drought.

The UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources is working to help farmers cope with the unwelcome outcome of historically low rainfall the last three years. UC scientists, with support from the California Department of Water Resources, have recorded video presentations on high-priority drought topics that are available for viewing on the UC California Institute of Water Resources drought webpages.

"We are bringing the latest research on drought and water from the UC system's leading experts to as many farmers, farm industry representatives, communities and students possible," said Doug Parker, director of the UC California Institute of Water Resources. "People working in the ag industry are busy this time of year. They can get information from these videos whenever and, using mobile devices, wherever it is convenient for them."

The first seven presentations in the "Insights: Water and Drought Online Seminar Series," each about half an hour in length, are now ready for viewing at http://ucanr.edu/insights. Topics are:

Groundwater and surface water interactions under water shortage
Thomas Harter, UC Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at UC Davis.

Crop water stress detection and monitoring
Kenneth Shackel, professor in the Department of Plant Sciences at UC Davis

Surface irrigation management under drought
Khaled Bali, UC Cooperative Extension advisor in Imperial County

ET-based irrigation scheduling and management considerations under drought
Richard Snyder, UC Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at UC Davis

Salinity management under drought for annual crops
Stephen Grattan, UC Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at UC Davis

Salinity management under drought for perennial crops
Stephen Grattan, UC Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at UC Davis

Water-use-efficient tillage, residue and irrigation management
Jeff Mitchell, UC Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Plant Sciences at UC Davis

Some of the topics that will soon be added to the online drought series are:

Managing deficit irrigation
Marshall English, professor emeritus at Oregon State University

Managing rice systems with limited water
Bruce Linquist, UC Davis

Climate change and paleoclimatology: 2013/1014 in perspective
Lynn Ingram, UC Berkeley

Available tools for estimating soil suitability to groundwater banking
Antony O'Geen, UC Davis

Irrigation management of tomato under drought conditions
Eugene Miyao, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources

How Will Monitoring Soil Moisture Save Me Water?
Dan Johnson, USDA-NRCS California State Water Manager

Winegrapes water management under drought
Paul Verdegaal, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources

Irrigation management of fruit and nut crops under Sacramento Valley conditions
Allan Fulton, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources

Alfalfa water demand and management under drought
Daniel Putnam, UC Davis

Field irrigation monitoring for maximum efficiency under drought conditions
Blake Sanden, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources

Subtropical orchards management under droughts
Ben Faber, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources

Additional valuable information from California academic institutions for dealing with the drought in the short-term and long-term is available at California Drought Resources, http://ucanr.edu/drought. The pages are regularly updated to bring new developments from the state's university and colleges to a broad range of communities, including farmers, ranchers, landscaping professionals, policymakers and California residents.

For more information on Insights: Water and Drought Online Seminar Series, contact Faith Kearns, UC California Institute for Water Resources, faith.kearns@ucop.edu.
 

March 17, 2014 | 12:17 PM

A John Morgan from Lost River Winery in Washington responds to the blog post: TTB Ruling Clarifies Retailers May Bottle and Sell Refillable Wine Growlers

Actually, the Washington Bill awaiting Governor Inslee's signature would not allow retailers to fill growlers. The bill put forward by Family Wineries of Washington State, as originally proposed, would have done so (allowed growlers filling in taverns, wine and beer specialty shops, restaurants and breweries - everywhere beer can be sold in growlers - as well as in winery secondary tasting rooms). Unfortunately the Washington Wine Institute and California Wine Institute threatened to oppose the bill unless the scope was limited to winery secondary tasting rooms only.

Interestingly, neither the CWI or the WWI objected to a bill, also awaiting the Governor's signature, that would allow filling of cider growlers (wine under 7% alcohol made from apples or pears) all the places that beer growlers can be filled.

March 17, 2014 | 7:14 AM

WiVi Central Coast 2014, the wine industry's largest symposium and tradeshow on the Central Coast, starts this week at the Paso Robles Event Center. Hosted by Wine Business Monthly and Precision Ag Consulting, WiVi features a tradeshow with more than 100 exhibitors and two days of concurrent sessions that focus on regional viticulture, enology and wine marketing topics.

The seminars start Wednesday, March 19 and will feature today’s industry leaders who will address current topics relevant to grape growing, wine production and marketing on the Central Coast. The tradeshow on March 20 will bring suppliers from across the nation that want to showcase their products and services at a time and place that’s convenient and accessible for California winegrape growers and winemakers.

The Wine Business Monthly editorial team is heading down to Paso Robles tomorrow. We hope to see you there!

More information can be found at www.wivicentralcoast.com.
 

Friday, March 14, 2014
March 14, 2014 | 7:57 AM

Across the newsdesk this week is a new release from TGIC Importers, Inc. The Seducer was released in January 2014, and is targeting the "confident, adventurous, fashionable" woman.

TGIC Importers President Alex Guarachi said that The Seducer is fun, but is still a serious wine.

The Seducer 2012 uses its proprietary name Red Rendezvous for its blend characterized by red and black berries, vanilla and spice, The Seducer delivers a bold, yet graceful wine style.

The Seducer emphasizes sophistication and style with its provocative packaging and will retail for $14.99.

Thursday, March 13, 2014
March 13, 2014 | 8:40 AM

An infographic from Matrix Video Productions shows how to create a successful YouTube video. According to Matrix, Youtube is the sixth most popular content marketing tactic, and 70 percent of B2B marketers use online video with their overall strategies.

Jordan Vineyard & Winery, with their video blogs, and the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance, with their video campaigns of Paso Wine Man, are examples of wine industry companies who are successfully using video in their marketing programs.

See tips below in this infographic on how to create a successful video.

 

by Cyril Penn | March 13, 2014 | 7:00 AM

The U.S. Department of Treasury’s Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau issued a ruling yesterday clarifying how retailers can legally fill growlers with tax-paid wine for consumption off premise: by registering as tax-paid wine bottling houses.

Whole Foods, a leader in keg wine and in reusable containers, has been selling wine in growlers in Texas for the past two years, and helped pave the way for the TTB ruling. Whole Foods already serves a lot of wine on its premises that is packaged in kegs so growlers are a logical next step.

“As a market leader in terms of alternative alcohol marketing, they’re cutting edge and the concept of the reusable containers really fits their image.” Compliance Service of America principal Alex Heckathorn ‎said.

Beer is more commonly served in growlers for off premise consumption but federal regulations previously didn’t specifically permit retailers to repackage or rebottle wine.

Two states – Oregon and Texas – specifically allow retailers to fill growlers with wine for sale off-premise already. In a third state – Washington – legislation awaiting the governor’s signature would allow retailers to bottle wine for off-premise consumption. Legislation recently introduced in Tennessee would also specifically allow retailers to sell wine in refillable containers.

There’s some concern coming from industry trade groups that growlers may not be a good idea because of the risks of oxidation. There’s also some skepticism in the beer word, where retailers are increasingly offering growlers.

According to Wilridge Winery winemaker Paul Beverage, who is also with Family Winemakers of Washington, legislation to allow retailers to sell growers was initially derailed in Washington, in part because of the ambiguity about the federal rules.

“We hope to be filling growlers at Pike Place market in Seattle this summer,” Beverage said. “We’ve been doing it at our winery in the Madrona area of Seattle for two or three years now and it’s been hugely successful. People love it.”

John Morgan Comments:

Actually, the Washington Bill awaiting Governor Inslee's signature would not allow retailers to fill growlers. The bill put forward by Family Wineries of Washington State, as originally proposed, would have done so (allowed growlers filling in taverns, wine and beer specialty shops, restaurants and breweries - everywhere beer can be sold in growlers - as well as in winery secondary tasting rooms). Unfortunately the Washington Wine Institute and California Wine Institute threatened to oppose the bill unless the scope was limited to winery secondary tasting rooms only.

Interestingly, neither the CWI or the WWI objected to a bill, also awaiting the Governor's signature, that would allow filling of cider growlers (wine under 7% alcohol made from apples or pears) all the places that beer growlers can be filled.

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