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Division Winemaking Company Takes Evolutionary Step With New Fall Wines and Labels

Posted on November 13, 2017

PORTLAND, Ore. (November 13, 2017) – Division Winemaking Company’s (DWC) founders Kate Norris and Tom Monroe celebrate fall with their 7th vintage release, offering thoughtfully selected wines with a brand new look! Well known for their production of lesser-known wine varietals, DWC has become an ambassador for the new generation of Portland produced wines and serves as a guide to the hottest upcoming varietals and wines such as Gamay Noir, Chenin Blanc, and old world style rosés. This year, they debut their fall releases with brand new label designs. This evolutionary step in the winery’s history includes a unique artistic rendition for each wine by local artist John Fisher. Each label has a family based on variety, i.e. Chardonnay, Gamay, Pinot Noir, etc. and within each family, an artistic rendition of the idea of "Division, " with a distinct stripe. The single vineyards wines stripes inspired by the soil/bedrock strata, while the Chardonnay Un and Pinot Noir Un have solid stripes that differentiate them as the cuvée level wines.

Norris and Monroe’s favorite vintage since 2010, the 2016 vintage was less about ups and downs, and more about the transition from the end of the three year heat streak we experienced in the Pacific Northwest. These above average temperatures hung on during the beginning of the growing year, but gave way to very mild and nearly perfect conditions starting in June and carrying through to harvest.The cooler end of the season meant the wines were gifted with beautiful acids, which allowed DWC to make exceptional age worthy wines.


The DWC wine clubs serve as a great way to taste your way through new wines, learn about unique varietals, and experience the next wave of Oregon winemaking with select wines sent to your door or available for pick up at the winery twice a year. DWC will begin shipments for fall releases and for the wine clubs during the second week of November and will continue bi-weekly shipments until the 15th of December. Featuring the “Undivided” collection with six wines shipped twice a year and the “Divide and Conquer” with a customer choice of twelve wines, also released twice per year. Plus, for the serious Gamay fans, you can sign up for DWC’s all Gamay Club. Gain access to special wine club only wines, significant savings on wines and maybe best of all, reduced and free shipping for our Divide & Conquer Club members. For more information visit https://www.divisionwineco.com/.

2017 Fall Wine Releases


2016 Division Chardonnay “Un” Willamette Valley
A return to cool climate greatness! After two uncharacteristically and record setting consecutively hot and dry years that began during the summer of 2014, the spell finally relented in the late spring of 2016. Yes, the warm 2015/2016 winter meant an early start to the 2016 season in March, but the key months from flowering to harvest were nearly textbook perfect conditions for growing world class Chardonnay, and we couldn’t be more excited! We know that the Pacific Northwest and world around us is changing due to global climate heating, which will invariably effect the way we farm and even what we farm in the Willamette Valley for decades to come, but we’re more than pleased for a vintage like 2016 and believe you will be too!


We are once again very pleased that our Chardonnay cuvee has an ample representation from the amazing, but very finite number of, old vine sites, including our Eola Springs Mendoza clone block and a new to us site in the Southern Willamette called Dell’Ucello (originally planted in the mid-80s for sparkling wine). We also continue to work with our favorite Biodynamic site, Johan Vineyards, as well as Methven Family Vineyards in the Eola-Amity Hills. The vintage was perfect for the old vine sites, which sometimes struggle to ripen in cooler years. They were both dense and flavorful, but still nervy and vibrant at the core, not mention in perfect health! The two Dijon sites were thankfully less ripe than in 2015 and really shined this year in a way they had not in the two very warm previous years.


Like in 2015, we utilized the pied de cuve (vineyard native yeast cultivation) build up, a technique that we had been using for some of the red ferments and now use for nearly all of our ferments. The method resulted in fantastic success for the Chardonnay sites this year, which led to a gorgeously complex final wine that did not struggle to complete primary fermentation. The fermentations were long and cool in our first new Austrian oak barrel, several neutral French oak Burgundy barrels, as well as one new French "Aquaflex" barrel, a water bent barrel designed to restrain oak flavor impact without losing valuable tannin and numerous compounds that enhance structure and elegance. As typical with cool in barrel fermentations, they take a while, but in 2016, we were surprised to find everything that finished primary fermentation by March of 2017. The wines completed the secondary malolactic fermentation by late spring of 2017 and for the first time ever for us, we were able to avoid sulfite additions to all but two barrels until just before bottling - something we think dramatically increased the complexity of this wine.
The 2016 Chardonnay “Un” is a return to the more acid driven style we prefer from this glorious grape. The aromatics are a nice balance of stone fruit, like peach, as well as fragrant flowers and the ever present saline notes we typically notice in our Chardonnay. The palate is electric with clear fresh pear, peach and light mineral characteristics. The 2016 Division Chardonnay “Un” is not as rich as the prior vintage and is more balanced with acidity, but with phenolic flavor depth. We are very pleased with the vintage and believe the wine is both ready to drink and ready to age for a few years!


2013 Division “La Tempête” Brut Rosé of Pinot Noir Vista Hills Vineyard, Dundee Hills
2013 was in many ways a tale of two separate vintages during the same year. After a very nice and warm growing season, the Willamette Valley was tormented with two powerful wind and rain storms in September. The Dundee Hills AVA, where Vista Hills Vineyard is located, was hit especially hard, and we were forced to pick this site before grape maturity had been reached on the vines. The chemistry of the fruit (brix, acids and pH) when it arrived at the winery had none of the markings of a red wine to live up to the pedigree of the AVA, so we decided to press the lot for a possible rosé. We went ahead fermented it to dryness in tank and after much tasting and discussing, made the decision to try to make a méthode Champenoise style sparkling wine, our first attempt to date, and something so exiting as we love bubbles (who doesn't?!) With the help of Teutonic Winery and some friends in Champagne, we learned the ins and outs to get started on this sparkling method, and in the winter of 2014 put the wine in to tirage for what turned out to be three plus years of lees ageing. We began test disgorgements in early 2017 and found the wine to be simply delicious, with savory strawberry notes and a lot of depth and intriguing earthiness. In fact this wine had turned out so incredibly well, really showing that you can make what seems like lemons into lemonade, as they say! We're proud to say this bottling saved the day, even 4 years after those very complicated storm conditions in 2013, and in recognition and remembrance, we named it “La Tempête,” which translates to The Storm in English.


2015 Division Pinot Noir “Un” Willamette Valley
A return to cool climate greatness! After two uncharacteristically and record setting consecutively hot and dry years that began during the summer of 2014, the spell finally relented in the late spring of 2016. Yes, the warm 2015/2016 winter meant an early start to the 2016 season in March, but the key months from flowering to harvest were nearly textbook perfect conditions for growing world class Pinot Noir, and we couldn’t be more excited! We know that the Pacific Northwest and world around us is changing due to global climate heating, which will invariably effect the way we farm and even what we farm in the Willamette Valley for decades to come, but we’re more than pleased for a vintage like 2016 and believe you will be too!


As in years past, we approach the Division Pinot Noir “Un” cuvee, our only Division pinot noir featuring multiple pinot noir sites, as our opportunity to make a vintage character wine in our lighter finesse driven style that is a comprehensive look at all of our very fine Eola-Amity Hills dominated Willamette Valley wine. In other words, it’s our chance to make our favorite blend from our nearly 50 Pinot Noir barrels and puncheons. Our vineyard roster in 2016 is clearly the best we’ve ever had and the wines and especially our flagship Pinot Noir “Un” cuvee are reflective of that. We are pleased to announced a long term lease agreement with two blocks of our very first vineyard, Eola Springs Vineyard, that we believe to be one of the best vineyards for Pinot Noir anywhere in the U.S. - it’s also the star of our Pinot Noir “Deux” wine. We continue to be very proud that all of our Pinot Noir vineyards are sustainably farmed and nearly 75% of the grapes for the Pinot Noir “Un” cuvee are farmed organically and/or Biodynamically. The Eola Springs vineyard continues its transition to Biodynamic principled farming while still being treated for Phylloxera in the old vines and we look forward to the day when we can that all of our grapes are at the very least, organically farmed.


All lots were fermented either spontaneously or via a pied de cuve (vineyard native yeast cultivation) build up. We utilized varying techniques, including a significant portions of whole cluster in some of the Bjornson & Armstrong ferments and one all whole cluster carbonic fermentation with one of the Johan ferments to diversify the wine types and provide more spice, nuance and nerve in the wine. The flavors and grape quality from 2016 were simply the best we’ve seen and our significant experience working with minimal manipulation techniques in the cellar truly shines through in this year’s wine.


We aged the wine in mostly French oak and a small amount of Austrian Oak, with approximately 15% in new barrels and puncheons, for 10 months without any racking before bottling. For the first time ever, we made only one sulfite addition, made just before bottling. Back in 2014, we believed we made our best Pinot Noir “Un” cuvee to date, and at the time, it was our best to date and very well received. That said, the 2016 is simply better and while we are done with saying the word “best,” we’re highly confident you will agree on this wine. The aromatics are dense and airy at the same time, with deep earthy spices, raspberry and an almost pencil lead notes. The palate is full, but not heavy, with a serious amount of length for a base level Pinot. It’s dominated by wild/brambly raspberry flavors and dark mineral layers. Drink up now or wait a few months, years, etc., but don’t miss this one!


2016 Division Pinot Noir “Deux” Eola Springs Vineyard, Eola Amity Hills
A return to cool climate greatness! After two uncharacteristically and record setting consecutively hot and dry years that began during the summer of 2014, the spell finally relented in the late spring of 2016. Yes, the warm 2015/2016 winter meant an early start to the 2016 season in March, but the key months from flowering to harvest were nearly textbook perfect conditions for growing world class Pinot Noir, and we couldn’t be more excited! We know that the Pacific Northwest and world around us is changing due to global climate heating, which will invariably affect the way we farm and even what we farm in the Willamette Valley for decades to come, but we’re more than pleased for a vintage like 2016 and believe you will be too!


We are pleased to announced a long term lease agreement with two blocks of our very first vineyard, Eola Springs Vineyard, that we believe to be one of the best vineyards for Pinot Noir anywhere in the U.S. - it also is and will be the star of our Pinot Noir “Deux” wine for many years to come. What really makes Eola Springs special to us is not just its place in our history, but its place in the Willamette


Valley’s wine growing history. Eola Springs was originally planted during 1972 to Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, as well as Cabernet Sauvignon and Muscat. The Cab Sauv is long gone, while the Farmhouse block planted in 1980 on its own roots makes up our 2016 Pinot Noir “Deux.” The site features the region’s classic volcanic basalt bedrock, but is overlaid with some of the most dense marine sedimentary (high calcium eroded oyster shells and mollusks) soils in the Eola-Amity Hills - a truly complex mix that give the site its distinct briny and mineral character perceived in the wines.


The Eola-Springs Farmhouse Block Pinot Noir was fermented with a pied de cuve (vineyard native yeast cultivation) build up with nearly 50% whole cluster grapes in the in vat and lasted approximately 25 days. We aged the wine for 10 months in neutral French oak barrels and puncheons (500L), with approximately 25% in new oak and the rest in neutral oak. Our view our job in the cellar is to resist the temptations to do too much and really let our great and varied terrior do the work. Hence, the wine was aged without interference from us after barreling and was bottled unfined and unfiltered with only a small sulfur addition.


We’re not shy about our feelings for the 2016 vintage or this magical vineyard and the 2016 Division Pinot Noir “Deux” Eola Springs Vineyard is simply exquisite! The tension, finesse, textural precision remind are eerily old world in character. The wine has a dense fruit savory strawberry and chalky aromatics that lends itself to this site’s distinct briny notes with just the lightest touch of fine oak. On the palate, the wine is long, balanced with an airiness while still delivering a punch of strawberries, cardamom and finishing with a lingering mineral note. We expect the medium bodied wine to be a fine ager indeed, while still delivering a very pleasant youthful wine for your glass!


2015 Division Pinot Noir “Trois” Temperance Hill Vineyard Eola-Amity Hills
The Willamette Valley is typically one of the coolest and wettest major wine growing regions in the U.S, which clearly favors the delicate, but seemingly boundless potential of the Pinot Noir grape that seems to show its best on the fringes of suitable farming. The 2015 growing year proved to be the driest and hottest on record in the Pacific Northwest - a benchmark we can’t help but attribute to our changing global climate. Thankfully, the hottest year ever in Oregon is still well within the boundaries of growing world class Pinot Noir, it just meant we needed to rethink some of our farming and winemaking practices to adjust for the climate.


First planted in 1980 on what is believed to be the remnants of an active volcano, this impeccably farmed Certified Organic vineyard is situated between 660 and 860 feet in elevation on Nekia, Jory and Rittner soils. The elevation aspect lead to warm and sunny days and very cool evenings, which helps the Pinot Noir from Temperance retain its legendary acidity while still demonstrating deep intensity and complete phenolic ripeness. Temperance Hill is farmed by Dai Crisp, one of the best viticulturists in Oregon, or in the U.S. for that matter, with care, vast knowledge and dedication - we are amazed by him. In other words, this is a seriously spectacular vineyard that we are honored to be making wine from.


Our .85 acre block at Temperance is the called the “Upper Bench”, which was planted in 2002 and is located near the crest of the original planting of Pinot Noir and Gewu?rztraminer. We went with a favorite combo of the elegant and red fruit oriented Dijon 777 anchored with the earthy and rustic Pommard clones. The co-fermented lot was fermented by utilizing a pied de cuve build up from the native flora on the site picked a week for before harvesting the blocks. A small portion of whole cluster, less than 25%, was layered in the ferment to help add more savory aspects as the warmer year tends to show for fruitiness. Our harvested grapes were beautiful and picked at the optimal moment for such a warm vintage at 23.7 brix and 3.31 pH with dark ripe phenolic flavors, lots of spice and soft skins.
We aged the three barrel blend for 10 months in a combination of a one new barrel and two neutral barrels and then for one year in bottle to help settle and harmonize the wine. Once again, and surely due in part to the intensely warm and dry growing season, our most intense, powerful and austere Pinot Noir. The initial aromatics are pure Temperance Pinot Noir, which is one of the maybe dozen Oregon sites with remarkably distinctive aromatics that feature deep black cherries, spices and fresh dried tobacco leaves. This ruby colored wine is all cherry and intense minerally meat on the palate that has soft coating tannins that fit perfectly with the textual components. This is definitely our most complex Pinot Noir from 2015 and a wine worth holding for a while to see what evolves.


2015 Division Pinot Noir “Cinq” Armstrong Vineyard Ribbon Ridge
The Willamette Valley is typically one of the coolest and wettest major wine growing regions in the U.S, which clearly favors the delicate, but seemingly boundless potential of the Pinot Noir grape that seems to show its best on the fringes of suitable farming. The 2015 growing year proved to be the driest and hottest on record in the Pacific Northwest - a benchmark we can’t help but attribute to our changing global climate. Thankfully, the hottest year ever in Oregon is still well within the boundaries of growing world class Pinot Noir, it just meant we needed to rethink some of our farming and winemaking practices to adjust for the climate.


The Armstrong Vineyard is a relatively young vineyard in the youngest, but quickly becoming famous Willamette Valley AVA called the Ribbon Ridge. The began in 2007, but happens to be situated next some of Oregon’s most highly acclaimed & coveted vineyards. We are thrilled for our second year working with these soils formed from volcanic remnants, locally called Nekia soil, and marine sedimentary overlay against basalt bedrock. The site’s higher elevation and protected aspect facing mostly southeast is showing early potential of turning into another top vineyard like its more famous neighbors - for now that is!


Our previous experience in the Ribbon Ridge has provided us with experience that the grapes in this small appellation ripen more quickly than the other nearby Willamette Valley AVAs. Doug Ackerman’s thoughtful and detailed management of his organically farmed vines helped to slow vigor and lengthen the maturity time to better develop complex flavors. The harvest was split into two picking days, with the Dijon 667 and Wadensvil harvested first and the Pommard about a week later. Each lot was fermented separately utilizing a pied de cuve build up from the native flora on the site picked a week for before harvesting the blocks. The 667/Wadensvil co-ferment was mostly whole cluster and the Pommard mostly destermmed in order to achieve one ferment of softer and more earthy character (whole cluster) and the other more structured and dense. Our harvested grapes were beautiful, tasty and picked at an earlier time than some of sites, but perfect for our style of higher acidity and more freshness in the wines.


We were so thoroughly impressed with out first Armstrong single site wine in 2014 that we knew we were on to something with this unique site and would be continuing vineyard series in 2015. The “Cinq” cuvee, our 5th from the 2015 vintage, was aged in all French Oak, one new barrel and two neutral for 10 months, without any racking. The Armstrong pinot provides a very distinctive difference from our other single site Pinot Noir wines, which all come from the more volcanic clay based soils in the Eola Amity Hills as demonstrated by it’s deep brooding kirsch like fruit and spicy and earthy tones. The fruit lends itself to the dark red spectrum, especially cherries and the palate is full and dense with firm, yet modest tannins and has incredible balance. This is wine that has a fair amount of openness from the warm and ripe vintage, but should cellar well for the next five to ten years.


2016 Division Gamay Noir “Cru” Methven Family Vineyards Eola-Amity Hills
A return to cool climate greatness! After two uncharacteristically and record setting consecutively hot and dry years that began during the summer of 2014, the spell finally relented in the late spring of 2016. Yes, the warm 2015/2016 winter meant an early start to the 2016 season in March, but the key months from flowering to harvest were nearly textbook perfect conditions for growing world class Pinot Noir, and we couldn’t be more excited! We know that the Pacific Northwest and world around us is changing due to global climate heating, which will invariably effect the way we farm and even what we farm in the Willamette Valley for decades to come, but we’re more than pleased for a vintage like 2016 and believe you will be too!


Gamay has always been a favorite grape for us and Methven Family Vineyards in the Eola-Amity Hills provided us with our first opportunity in 2011 to produce a wine from Oregon Gamay grapes. Today, nearly eight years later, it’s still our largest and most important Gamay vineyard in Oregon and we believe our experience with the grapes made there produce one of our best Gamay wines.


We split the grapes from Methven into two separate fermentation lots, one that was destemmed (the traditional Burgundian method) and the other that was a whole cluster carbonic fermentation (the traditional Beaujolais method) in a closed stainless steel tank. Both lots were fermented with a pied de cuve build up (vineyard native yeast cultivation), each lasting between 20-25 days before being aged in neutral French oak barrels and a 500L puncheon.
We continue to truly feel the time learned understanding this site and our use of pied de cuve fermentations has led to excellent results in the wines from this site. The mix of both styles of fermentation give us a beautiful wine that shows off Oregon terroir while honoring the classic Beaujolais Gamay character.


The 2016 Division Gamay Noir “Cru” is both lithe and classic with a gorgeous harmony of carbonic herbal and strawberry fruit notes layered in with the structure and generous mineral character extracted from the traditional ferment. Aromatically, this wine has amazing umami - a satisfying stew of rocks, strawberries, fresh herbs and white pepper. The palate shows a nervy lighter to mid-weight and has silky texture that lingers well after the sip. We were fortunate enough to make 110 cases this year and are excited that this year’s wine will find a way to many happy Gamay lovers!


2016 Division Chenin Blanc “Inondé” Willard Farms, Columbia Valley
One of fastest growing and diverse American wine growing regions of the past 40 years is the Columbia Valley, a wide swath of land that reaches from the northern border of Oregon to well into the northeastern parts of Washington State. Within this region is a is the Yakima Valley, home to our old vine Chenin Blanc at Willard Farms. The Willard Chenin vines are planted on soils formed from volcanic Miocene uplift against basalt bedrock with the primary top soil being made up of quartz and lime- silica, overlaid with the mixed sedimentary runoff of Missoula Floods that makes the soils in the region so dynamic and unique. The newly renamed Chenin Blanc “Inonde?,” which means “to flood” in French, was named after the influence of these Missoula Floods on the soils and terroir in the Columbia Valley. We love this particular site, as it is one of the last remaining old vine Chenin Blanc sites in the Pacific Northwest, has demonstrated a unique and interesting terroir influence in the wines, and is farmed by an excellent, albeit quirky, farmer named Jim Willard who has a deep understanding of the soils and region.


We believe the best wines will be made by picking before overly ripe characteristics dominate the wine and balance, freshness and finesse suffer. Therefore, like in the some of the best domaines of the Loire Valley where Chenin Blanc hails from, we performed two passes of picking. We have utilized this technique since our first year with the vineyard in 2013 and clearly taste the added complexity and dimension that it brings. In 2016, the first pass was completed by mid September, with fruit quality that was healthy and with bright acidity and chalky flavors. The second picking was completed approximately two weeks later and was perfectly ripe and delicious. For the first time, we utilized a pressing technique most common to making high quality Champagne, which involves redirecting the heart of the press “coeur de cuvee” directly into barrel and hence, bypassing the settling with the rest of the pressing. This led to a wine of significant depth and character and something we believe shows the excellent promise of Chenin Blanc from the Northwest.


The 2016 Division Chenin Blanc “Inonde?” is a brilliantly intense and balanced Chenin Blanc. The crux of this wine, is the mid and back palate featuring lanolin character, chalky minerality and floral notes. The palate is ripe, dry and filled with tense acidity that brings the whole wine together. The wine is drinking very well at the moment, especially if opened an hour or two in advance, however, we believe this wine has a very long future ahead of it, perhaps even a few decades before peaking!


2016 Division Cabernet Franc “Granit” Mae’s Vineyard Applegate Valley

We love the Mae’s Vineyard (part of the Quady North Vineyards) in the Applegate Valley AVA in southern Oregon, and have worked with the grapes as the sole component of our Loire clones, dominated by a base of Cabernet Franc. This was our fourth year leasing the block of Mae’s Loire clone Cabernet Franc. Grower/Owner, Herb Quady has become one, if not, the best growers in the region who is doing all the right things with the fantastic Oregon pink granite bedrock based soils. The Quady site in the Applegate Valley AVA in the hills above the Applegate river and while much warmer than the Willamette Valley, usually, the Quady site, at a high elevation, is cooler and wetter than the Rogue Valley AVA to that is lower and to the east. Herb grew up in the family of the famed Quady Winery in California’s Central Valley, later becoming the vineyard manager for Randall Graham’s Bonny Doon wine empire before first coming north to southern Oregon with his sights on applying organic farming techniques to a region with mostly undiscovered vineyard potential. His Mae’s Vineyard block slopes southeast into the Applegate Valley in what can only be said as one the prettiest spots we’ve seen in the state. Loamy/clay and marine sediment overlay a large broken granite slab (yes granite!), which makes this a truly distinctive site to work with.

We picked our Cab Franc at Quady over two periods, an early picking that mostly went to the Béton blend and the later pick which was mostly used for our varietal Cabernet Franc, featured here. This year, we had decent yields in the vineyard, but were still below or targeted expectations and hence, we were only able to make four barrels once again. As has become our modus operandi for fermentations, we utilized the pied de cuve (native yeast build-ups) technique to harness as much of the native yeast flora from the site to best express the sense of place each of these wines came from. We had two Cabernet Franc ferments, our large one which was partial whole cluster in our cement tank, and another component that was mostly destemmed and fermented in a stainless tank. Each of the ferments were fairly lengthy, notably the later pick portion, which was on the skins in one of our concrete fermenters for about a month.

The 2016 Cabernet Franc “Granit” release is as distinct as its vintage and once again the terrior of this site is as distinct as any in the state. Compared to the tiny 2015 vintage, the 2016 is a bit more robust and has a denser fruit core that echo’s a more ripe Saumur or Bourgueil vintage in the Loire that we’ve seen to date. The initial aromatics are star anise, blackberry and a just a hint of the famous Cabernet Franc-esque jalapeño, followed by some pretty herbal and spice notes. The texture is medium bodied and soft, with nice smooth tannins with a distinct palate that brings darker berries, dried tea and a good amount of earthiness. There’s only 90 cases or so cases this year of this wine, so be sure to grab a bottle quick if you’re a fan of the Loire style Cab Franc!

About Division Winemaking Company
“Pair with good times, good food and good people” is the philosophy of the Division Winemaking Company, founded in 2010 by winemakers Kate Norris and Thomas Monroe. Inspired by the wineries of Loire, Burgundy and the Northern Rhone, the pioneering urban winery creates sustainable and unique varietals of minimalist approach Oregon wines including Pinot Noir, Gamay, Chardonnay, Rosé, Chenin, Riesling, Cabernet Franc, Cot, Syrah, and Grenache. Division Winemaking Company (DWC) includes the Division Winemaking Company label, the more approachable Division-Villages label and as well as Gamine, inspired by the Rhone Valley and a personal expression of co-founder Kate Norris’ love of the region. Norris and Monroe have been leaders in pursuing the Oregon-Loire Valley confluence, cultivating grapes that are native to the French winemaking region known for Chenin Blanc, Cabernet Franc and Gamay. From their minimal intervention approach, focusing on terroir and true varietal expression over more industrialized techniques, to their promotion of unique varietals through pioneering campaigns like #DrinkChenin and I Love Gamay, their award winning wines serve as an example for sustainable production and connection between the old world experience and applying it in a new world environment. In 2017, the New York Times named Division’s Gamay Noir a “wonderful” gamay in its Oregon Trail story. Portland Monthly named Division’s 2016 L’Isle Verte Chenin Blanc to its 50 Oregon Wines. In 2016, Norris and Monroe were named to Wine Enthusiast’s 40 Under 40 tastemakers list. The winemakers have been profiled by Willamette Week, and named in the San Francisco Chronicle’s article All You Wanted to Know About This Year’s Winemakers to Watch. DWC has been named an Oregon Winery to Watch by Wine Press Northwest, a top urban winery by Wine Enthusiast, and their wines have been featured in the New York Times by Eric Asimov as Wines for Thanksgiving the Refresh the Palate and Willamette Valley’s excellent small producers. Their 2011 Gamay Noir was the only wine from the United States to win a gold medal at the 2014 International Competition of Gamay in France. Find more information at https://www.divisionwineco.com/ on Facebook Division Wine Co, Twitter @divisionwineco or by calling 503-208-2061.

Website: https://www.divisionwineco.com/

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