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April 8, 2013 | 12:15 PM

Dr. Lee Hannah, lead author and Senior Scientist for Climate Change Biology at Conservation International’s new Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Ecosystem Science and Economics, said:

“Climate change is going to move potential wine-producing regions all over the map. These global changes put the squeeze on wildlife and nature’s capacity to sustain human life in some surprising places. Consumer awareness, industry and conservation actions are all needed to help keep high quality wine flowing without unintended consequences for nature and the flows of goods and services it provides people. This is just the tip of the iceberg – the same will be true for many other crops.”

Publication of the first study to analyze impacts of climate change on wine production AND conservation in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has been released today. Kevin Connor of Conservation International points out some key points from the paper:

The current area suitable for wine grape growing will shrink by as much as 73% in certain parts of the world by mid-century.
Suitability for wine production will open up in new areas that are current conservation lands, such as the panda habitat in China or Yellowstone Park in the U.S.
Climate change adaptation strategies are urgently needed to maintain productivity and to minimize impacts on terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems.
Wine grapes are particularly sensitive to climate. Findings of this study are symbolic for what will happen with other agricultural commodities.

View the paper.

Here is a blog from the paper's lead author.

Google Earth Flyover of the of the change in areas suitable for growing wine grapes through 2050: 



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